ARTS MAY 29 2014 COMMUNITY SING The Leisure World Community Sing met for its final songfest of the season May 20 and will be in summer recess until Monday, Sept. 8, one week after Labor Day. The Share a Favorite Recipe party, featuring healthy luncheon items, was a great success.
Amateur Time started with an enthusiastic Ben Berg, self-accompanied on piano, singing “Great Balls of Fire”; Rick Reyando followed with “I’ll Be Seeing You.” Sam Calderone and his ukulele did “Save the Last Dance” and “The Glory of Love.” Ethel Carter sang “Food, Glorious Food”; Byong Choi, “La Paloma”; and Ellen Brannigan and Shalla Callahan harmonized on “It Is No Secret.” Anita Ragole sang “Second-Hand Rose,” and Jerry Tester closed with “The Meeting in the Air.” Accompanists were Pat Kogok and Carol Robinson.
Then a fine group of Leisure World song lovers joined Lewis Ward as he led them through a popular selection of old-time favorites. When it was time to close the musical part of the evening, Lewis and Felicia led everyone in “Kum ba Yah.” Then it was party time, and the heavily loaded refreshment table was heartily relieved of its burden.
Thanks to Joe Sabroso, book lender and stage manager; Betty Ballen, pianist; and Felicia Ward, emcee.
Lewis and Felicia wish everyone a pleasant summer holiday, and look forward to seeing them again on Sept. 8.

ASTRONOMY
The Astronomy Club will meet from 6:30-8 p.m., Wednesday, June 4, Clubhouse 3, Room 3.
The program will include a DVD on a relevant astronomy topic. The club will discuss how telescopes work and what can be seen in the night sky through the club’s large Dobsonian telescope.
Last month, the planets Jupiter, Mars and Saturn were discussed. The club is committed to providing knowledge that is up-to-date and conform to reality.
All are welcome. Free coffee and snacks will be available.
To request discussion topics, call Mike Clairmont at 860-0902.
—Mike Clairmont

DANCE CLUB
The Dance Club will meet Friday at 6:15 p.m. to learn the rumba and at 7:15, for Latin club dances. Both classes are held in Clubhouse 6, upstairs in Room C.
Singles and couples are welcome. Invite your friends and family. Cost is $5 a class per person. Instructor Jeremy Pierson is an experienced teacher with 20 years experience.
For more information, contact Jeanine Greb, 296-5921.

THE COMPANY
by Lynn R. Heath
LW contributor

“An Evening with the Company at the Copacabana” is now being shown on Superwire channel 995 and Channel 95.861 at 4:45 p.m. and will be showing on SBTV Channel 3 in June (for show times, check SBTV.com under programming). DVDs of this production are available for $10 by contacting Steve Nichols at snicholshms@aol.com or call him at 221-4745.
Bruce Smith, Col. Parker in the Copacabana show, invites everyone to an open audition event to discover hidden talent in the LW community.
Come and participate in auditions on Thursday, June 26, in Clubhouse 1 at 6 p.m. It’s like “an evening at the Improv” for dancers, singers, comics, magicians and other entertainers. Steve Nichols, Sandi Post and Lynn R. Heath will be there to see who is a good fit for the club’s next production.
The auditions will include a happy hour so people can meet club members, enjoy entertainers and participate.
Bring favorite beverages and snacks. And it’s free. There will be a 50/50 cash drawing. The talent will be the feature of the evening. Performers could be great or they could fall on their faces, but no paddles this time, just a lot of fun. Don’t have a talent? Then be part of the audience and cheer them on.
Can’t sing, dance, do magic, got a puppet show, do comedy or create something really entertaining? Then join the volunteer group appropriately named Behind the Scenes. Help with the 50/50 drawings, costumes, stage crew, sound, scenery and all those important jobs that help make a production happen.
Doors open at 5 p.m. so get there early to be one of the first 20 acts that will get on the stage that night. Bring a picture, bio and dress for the audition. Tell talented friends or be part of the audience.
The auditions are in preparation for the next show. People must live in LW to participate. Each audition needs to be less than five minutes and a “new” act.
The Company will supply a CD player, mics, barstool and mic stand. For more information, contact Lynn at 296-5588 or lynnRheath@gmail.com.

GRF WEEKLY DANCE
The Golden Rain Foundation sponsors a weekly dance on Saturdays from 7-10 p.m. in Clubhouse 1. Howard Crossen will play June 1.

GRF MOVIE
“Maid in Manhattan,” rated PG-13, will be shown at 2 p.m., June 1, in Clubhouse 4.
It’s love at first sight when Marisa Ventura and fast-rising politician Christopher Marshall run into each other at a posh New York City hotel. The only problem? Christopher has mistaken Marisa for a guest, but she’s one of the maids.

LEISURE TIME DANCERS
Leisure Time Dancers will continue rumba and tango lessons in June. The class meets on Mondays. Rumba is at 2 p.m. and tango, at 3 in Clubhouse 6. For more information, call 434-6334.

SATURDAY MORNING DANCE CLUB
Candi Davis teaches dance classes at 9 and 10 a.m., Saturdays in Clubhouse 1 for the Saturday Morning Dance Club. On May 31, she will teach the rumba from 9-10 and nightclub two step from 10-11.
Dancers rotate, so partners are not required. People may attend one or both sessions, $5 each.

BALLET CLASS
by Lynn R. Heath
LW contributor

Come to Clubhouse 6, second floor, every Saturday from 1:30-2:30 p.m. to practice on the new ballet barre. Class is $3 per person.
Mel Lockett will teach basic ballet stretches including center floor work. He has studied with the Laguna Beach Ballet Co. and has taught at his own school in Orange County. After taking some time off to study music and electronics, he is back to share his dance knowledge with others. Everyone—men and women—is welcome. Wear comfortable clothing.
For more information, contact Diana Winkler at 493-0139 or Lynn R. Heath at 296-5588 or lynnRheath@gmail.com.

OLLI SENIOR UNIVERSITY REGISTRATION
The Osher Lifelong Learning Institute at California State University, Long Beach, will have summer registration beginning July 7. Registration is by mail or in person in the OLLI Classroom 101 on July 7. Thereafter people may register in the OLLI office located in the CSULB Human Services and Design Building (HS&D), Room 100, near the corner of Palo Verde Avenue and East University Drive. The Sun, an OLLI publication, lists classes offered. Once people decide which classes they want, they can register by mail or in person on July 7 or thereafter at the OLLI office.
OLLI senior university is offering a variety of lecture classes, including these new topics: Preserving Senior Independence (6 weeks), Advance Directives, Climate Change, Irish Writers, Ayurvedic Medicine, Topics in Jewish Studies and others.
Returning this session will be Copy Cat Art, Meditation, Opera through the Ages, Taking Better Photos and more.
For those looking to improve their health and endurance, OLLI offers Tai Chi Chih, Senior Yoga, Qi Qigong, Longevity Stick and others. All the fitness classes will be held in the Life Fitness Center, Rooms 107 and 110. OLLI computer classes are conducted in a 12-seat state of the art PC and Mac-equipped lab by skilled instructors. New computer classes this semester will be Computer Demystified (4 weeks) and iPad Apps Only.  These and many other classes will be offered from July 7-Aug. 29.
There are four convenient locations for classes: HS&D Building on the CSULB Campus, Rooms 101 and 119; OLLI Pine Avenue at 737 Pine Ave., Suite 202, and OLLI Leisure World and one at Rec Park Lawn Bowling Center and at the Albert Jewish Community Center, 3801 East Willow, Long Beach.
OLLI at CSULB’s annual membership fee of $40 covers the winter, spring, summer and fall sessions and is pro-rated for the spring and summer sessions at $20.
Tuition is $10 per lecture class and $35 per eight-week session, and $20 per four-week computer class. Parking permits are available for a fee. For more information, call the OLLI at CSULB office at 985-8237, send an email to olli@csulb.edu or visit the website at www.csulb.edu/centers/olli.

SCIENCE CLUB
The Science Discussion Club will discuss history of science in the western world from 2-3:15 p.m., June 12, in Clubhouse 3, Room 3.
The club will examine the history and developments of the Scientific Revolution, specifically the work of Sir Isaac Newton. Emphasis will be placed on how history and science are still current and vital today.
The club meets on the second and fourth Thursdays of the month in Clubhouse 3, Room 3. The next meeting is June 26. There are no dues or membership requirements.
For more information, call Mark Barnett, 430-2435.

COMMUNITY KARAOKE
by Margie Thompson
LW contributor

“50 Years and Holding” will be the theme of the Community Karaoke Club when it meets from 5:30-10 p.m., Wednesday, in Clubhouse 1. Byong and Yong Choi chose the theme and the venue to celebrate their wedding anniversary. They will provide refreshments for their family and new friends in Leisure World that evening. They are a lovely couple who have enjoyed many of the activities available in Lesiure World in the short time they have been here. It should be a romantic night dedicated to singing love songs.
Last week’s gathering was a lively one with 40 singers participating. Since it was approaching Memorial Day, the host and hostess started the night by singing patriotic songs with Walt Bier leading a standing audience with “God Bless America.” The Barnum brothers did a fine rendition of “America The Beautiful.”
The song “Red Red Wine” was sung twice, once by Ren Villaneuva while he was holding a small glass of red wine and later by Harold Hughes as he teased him by holding a large jug of red wine.
First-timers who were warmly welcomed included Sue Pippo and her brother Leslie Patalsky. They did a nice job singing “Horse With No Name.”
The audience enjoyed the strong voices of Bob and Gaye Slater. Bob is helpful to singers by offering practice sessions each Tuesday from 1-3 in Clubhouse 6.
All in all it was a busy, cheerful night with lots of variety in tunes sung and abilities, and a great audience to cheer singers on.
All are welcome.

DANCERS AND MIXERS
The Dancers & Mixers next dance will be held Monday, June 2, in Clubhouse 2 from 7-9:30. This is a change from the usual meeting day and clubhouse because of elections on the first Tuesday of June. All are welcome for a relaxing evening of friendship and dancing. Caremore Healthcare Group will be there and will provide great snacks. Bring beverages of choice. Admission is free; 50/50 tickets will be sold. Live music will be by Linda Herman, including a mixer and some line dancing. Singles and couples are welcome. Partners are not needed.  
May’s Cinco De Mayo dance had a good attendance, including a couple of amigos with sombreros. Lively dance music was played by Linda Herman. A big thank you goes to decorating committee members Dave and Marian Lufitz, Marian Beattie, John Hayes and Linda Herman. Greeters at the door were John Hlavac and Dave Lufitz. Come and enjoy the snacks and music and meet new friends. For more information, call 431-1257.

LONG BEACH SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA
Maestro Enrique Arturo Diemecke will conduct his last concert with the Long Beach Symphony Saturday, May 31, at 8 p.m., at the Terrace Theater in the Performing Arts Center. This is also the final concert of the Symphony’s current season.
Leisure World patrons have the convenience of a charter bus that leaves from the LW Amphitheater at 6:15 p.m., arriving in time for the concert preview. The bus charge is $75 for the season of six concerts or $l6 per concert for those who want to purchase single tickets. For bus information, call Nancy Jensen, 430-3215, or Kathleen Robinson, 598-6301. For symphony information, call 436-3203.
Guest soloist Chinese-born Di Wu will be featured in a performance of Rachmaninoff’s Piano Concerto No. 1. The all-Rachmaninoff program concludes with the composer’s iconic Symphony No. 2 in e minor.  All patrons are invited to attend a post-concert reception in celebration of Maestro Diemecke’s 13-year tenure.
In an article that he wrote for the 75th anniversary of the Symphony in the 2009-10 season, Maestro Diemecke stated, “Since my very first season in Long Beach, the most important thing I wanted to bring was to make “passion” the motto of our orchestra…I think we have accomplished that.” Indeed, the Maestro has accomplished that over the past 13 years, delivering music that reached to the heart of the audience. With his inimitably animated style on the podium and his entertaining banter over the microphone, Maestro Diemecke will be fondly remembered by the Symphony.
Matching Maestro Diemecke’s passion, is piano soloist, Di Wu who came to the U.S. in 1999 to study at the Manhattan School of Music, followed by studies at the Curtis Institute and the Juilliard School of Music. Named one of the “up-and-coming talents” in classical music by Musical America, New York-based Di Wu continues to enhance her reputation as an elegant and powerful musician. Her concerts have taken her across the globe, charming audiences from East to West with her “charisma, steely technique, and keen musical intelligence” (Philadelphia Inquirer) and her “fire and authority” (Washington Post).
Reflecting on the concert, the Symphony’s Executive Director, Kelly Ruggirello, commented, “We are so excited to share with our audience such a young, talented virtuoso as Ms. Wu who combines a musical maturity that is unparalleled amongst her peers.”
For more information about the works, ticket holders may attend a 7 p.m. pre-concert talk by Rich Capparela. Tickets start at $21; student tickets are available for $10. For more information or to purchase tickets, visit the Symphony’s website at www.lbso.org or call 436-3203, ext. 232.

CREATIVE WRITERS CLUB
The poetry division of the Leisure World Creative Writers Clubhas announced the winners of the annual poetry contest, which has serious and humorous categories.
In the serious category, first place went to Deane Cox for her poem “Cardboard in My Shoes.” Pat Wilson’s “Five Haikus” and Victor Gendrano’s for “The Light” tied for second. Third place went to Joe Sabroso for “Springtime.”
In the humorous category, Fred Wind’s “Wrinkle in Time” and Pat Wilson’s “If You Have a Man” tied for first place; Deane Cox won second for her poem “Criteria,” and Ethel Carter placed third for “The Ventriloquist.”
The Poetry Workshop will meet at 1:30 p.m., June 11, in Clubhouse 3, Room 9. Anne Shattuck will furnish refreshments. Residents who would like to share their poetry talent are invited to visit the workshop every second Wednesday of the month at 1:30 in Clubhouse 3, Room 9.
—Bob Vague
VIDEO PRODUCERS CLUB
by Joe Osuna
LW contributor

A host of new Leisure World-based programs are scheduled to air in June on local Time Warner Cable SBTV-3 at Channel 15.102 and Verizon Cable Channel 37. These programs are submitted by certified members of the Video Producers Club. Video producers are volunteers, not employees of SBTV-3.
Copies of the programs are available for $15 per DVD from Station Manager Robin Fort-Lincke. Contact her at SBTV03@gmail.com or 696-1404. Club Internet information is available at LWVPC.blogshot.com.
The following is the list of new shows:
•Centenarian Luncheon
The centenarian luncheon in April celebrated the lives of LW residents 100 years of age and older. Betty Coven was the master of ceremonies. Seal Beach Mayor Ellery A. Deaton presented awards to the centenarians. Assisting and serving lunch were members of the Sunshine and Hui O Hula clubs. Video camera operators were Joseph Chavez, Irene Cistaro, Gui Baker and Bonnie Cooper. Bonnie is the video producer of the half-hour program. Copies of the program are available through Bonnie Cooper.
•Hawaiian Fest
Hawaiian entertainment featuring the “Oahu” band and the Hui O Hula dancers last month in Clubhouse 1 is featured. Uncle Roddy and the Oahu Hawaiian band entertained; Hui O Hula instructor Jojo Weingart introduced the performers and shared the master of ceremonies job with Kaye Huff. Camera operators are Joe and Oralia Osuna. Joe is the video producer.
•Copacabana
The Company’s evening musical variety show “An Evening with the Company At the Copacabana” was presented April 19 in Clubhouse 2 to a standing-room only audience. Producer Lynn R. Heath, also directed and performed. She was was assisted by co-producers (as well as singers and performers) Steve Nichols and Tommy Williams. The Company cast also included singers and performers Jeanine Greb, Vickie Van Ert, Ben Berg, Eric Nelson, Sandy Hunt, Terry Humphrey, Ric Dizon, Bruce Smith, Shirlene and Joseph Chavez, David Noble, Helen Schultz and Tea Cup; Audrey McKenzie, T. Smith, Sally Glausser, the Pure Joy Dance Group and the rest of The Company’s crew. The video of the show was captured by club videographers Paul Bassett, Joe and Oralia Osuna and was produced, directed and edited by Paul Bassett.
•Public Service Announcements
Joseph Valentinetti, video producer, has two public service announcements he created. The first one is “ New Shell,” spoken verse on hope for a better tomorrow. The second one is “What Are You Waiting For?,” about the crime of elder abuse and what to do about it.
•Nicky and the Woman
Joseph Valentinetti is the video producer of “Nicky and the Woman.” This spoken verse explores the arc of a relationship from start to finish. It is a 15-minute program.
•Leisure World Orchestra
The Leisure World Orchestra performs a variety of music from classical to comedic in its spring concert. Composers such as Corelli, Brahms, Rodgers and Hammerstein, Leroy Anderson, Strauss and others are featured in this medley of hits. Steve Nichols is the video producer and Helen Uno was the camera operator.
•El Camino
Join Lynn R. Heath as she shares her adventure on the Camino de Santiago in the north of Spain through an iPhoto presentation with music. Steve Nichols contributed sound to the piece, and Lynn presents her photos and video as she revisits her walk of over 400 miles in September 2013 from the border of France to the Atlantic Ocean. As an adventurous senior, she has a lot to share with other adventurous seniors and armchair travelers. Enjoy her journey as she learns the true meaning of gratitude.
•Oxytocin
This half hour program with Dr. Marcia Baltimore discusses the chemical that causes the urge to “cuddle” with your partner. The cuddling chemical is called Oxytocin, which is generated by the brain. It is also known as the “love hormone.” Bob McCauley videotaped the program at the Superwire Studio. Joe Osuna is the video producer.
•Let the Good Times Roll
The doo wop club presents a one-hour of dancing and musical entertainment featuring Ben Berg and his Rhythm Rockers performing several times. Frank Destra and Joe Tucky are the master of ceremonies.
Joe and Oralia Osuna are the camera operators. Joe is the video producer.
by Joe Osuna
LW contributor

A host of new Leisure World-based programs are scheduled to air in June on local Time Warner Cable SBTV-3 at Channel 15.102 and Verizon Cable Channel 37. These programs are submitted by certified members of the Video Producers Club. Video producers are volunteers, not employees of SBTV-3.
Copies of the programs are available for $15 per DVD from Station Manager Robin Fort-Lincke. Contact her at SBTV03@gmail.com or 696-1404. Club Internet information is available at LWVPC.blogshot.com.
The following is the list of new shows:
•Centenarian Luncheon
The centenarian luncheon in April celebrated the lives of LW residents 100 years of age and older. Betty Coven was the master of ceremonies. Seal Beach Mayor Ellery A. Deaton presented awards to the centenarians. Assisting and serving lunch were members of the Sunshine and Hui O Hula clubs. Video camera operators were Joseph Chavez, Irene Cistaro, Gui Baker and Bonnie Cooper. Bonnie is the video producer of the half-hour program. Copies of the program are available through Bonnie Cooper.
•Hawaiian Fest
Hawaiian entertainment featuring the “Oahu” band and the Hui O Hula dancers last month in Clubhouse 1 is featured. Uncle Roddy and the Oahu Hawaiian band entertained; Hui O Hula instructor Jojo Weingart introduced the performers and shared the master of ceremonies job with Kaye Huff. Camera operators are Joe and Oralia Osuna. Joe is the video producer.
•Copacabana
The Company’s evening musical variety show “An Evening with the Company At the Copacabana” was presented April 19 in Clubhouse 2 to a standing-room only audience. Producer Lynn R. Heath, also directed and performed. She was was assisted by co-producers (as well as singers and performers) Steve Nichols and Tommy Williams. The Company cast also included singers and performers Jeanine Greb, Vickie Van Ert, Ben Berg, Eric Nelson, Sandy Hunt, Terry Humphrey, Ric Dizon, Bruce Smith, Shirlene and Joseph Chavez, David Noble, Helen Schultz and Tea Cup; Audrey McKenzie, T. Smith, Sally Glausser, the Pure Joy Dance Group and the rest of The Company’s crew. The video of the show was captured by club videographers Paul Bassett, Joe and Oralia Osuna and was produced, directed and edited by Paul Bassett.
•Public Service Announcements
Joseph Valentinetti, video producer, has two public service announcements he created. The first one is “ New Shell,” spoken verse on hope for a better tomorrow. The second one is “What Are You Waiting For?,” about the crime of elder abuse and what to do about it.
•Nicky and the Woman
Joseph Valentinetti is the video producer of “Nicky and the Woman.” This spoken verse explores the arc of a relationship from start to finish. It is a 15-minute program.
•Leisure World Orchestra
The Leisure World Orchestra performs a variety of music from classical to comedic in its spring concert. Composers such as Corelli, Brahms, Rodgers and Hammerstein, Leroy Anderson, Strauss and others are featured in this medley of hits. Steve Nichols is the video producer and Helen Uno was the camera operator.
•El Camino
Join Lynn R. Heath as she shares her adventure on the Camino de Santiago in the north of Spain through an iPhoto presentation with music. Steve Nichols contributed sound to the piece, and Lynn presents her photos and video as she revisits her walk of over 400 miles in September 2013 from the border of France to the Atlantic Ocean. As an adventurous senior, she has a lot to share with other adventurous seniors and armchair travelers. Enjoy her journey as she learns the true meaning of gratitude.
•Oxytocin
This half hour program with Dr. Marcia Baltimore discusses the chemical that causes the urge to “cuddle” with your partner. The cuddling chemical is called Oxytocin, which is generated by the brain. It is also known as the “love hormone.” Bob McCauley videotaped the program at the Superwire Studio. Joe Osuna is the video producer.
•Let the Good Times Roll
The doo wop club presents a one-hour of dancing and musical entertainment featuring Ben Berg and his Rhythm Rockers performing several times. Frank Destra and Joe Tucky are the master of ceremonies.
Joe and Oralia Osuna are the camera operators. Joe is the video producer.



PLAY REVIEW
“Tartuffe,” a revival of the play by Molière; now playing on the Segerstrom Stage, South Coast Repertory, 655 Town Center Drive, Costa Mesa, 92628-2197, through June 8, 714-708-5555, www.scr.org ; Ticket prices: $22-$72; running time: 2 hours 25 minutes.

by Larry Blake
LW contributor

In 1964, an enterprising group formed a theater company in Orange County. Their timing was good. As Orange County was growing, it was ripe for a theater company of its own. Fifty years later, South Coast Repertory (SCR) has continued to grow and become a nationally recognized company offering superior presentations.
Starting off in a small storefront, SCR is ending its 50th year. The first play they performed in 1964 was “Tartuffe” by Molière. They are again presenting Tartuffe to celebrate. It is an interesting and different production of Molière’s durable comedy.
The time is 17th century in France. We are in the home of Orgon (Laverne Seifert). His family is in an uproar. Orgon and his mother, Madame Pernelle (Michael Manuel) have fallen under the spell of Tartuffe (Steven Epp), a pious fraud. Tartuffe is a hypocrite, pretending to be pious. His real goal becomes apparent after a while, which is the fortune of Orgon and the hand of Orgon’s daughter Mariane (Lenne Klingaman) in marriage.
Marianne wants to wed Valère (Christopher Carley). She gets help from her mother, Elmire (Cate Scott Campbell); the maid Dorine (Suzanne Warmanen); and her brother, Damis (Brian Hostenske). But Tartuffe is clever and continues on his quest to take over the family fortune.
It appears that he will triumph. But this is a farce, and all turns out well in the end, with Trafuffe finally shown for the hypocrite that he is.
In this translation by David Bell, Orgon is emphasized more than the title character. There is more contemplation about why Orgon has married a younger woman, allowed this religious hypocrite to overtake his family, giving his daughter’s hand in marriage to the scoundrel, and his casual attitude in overlooking Tartuffe’s obvious advances on his wife. This is a different Tartuffe than what is usually performed. It’s interesting. But personally I prefer the poetic grace of the 1977 Richard Wilbur translation.
The production values, as always at SCR, are outstanding. From the simplistic set designed by Dominique Serrand to the sumptuous costumes of Sonya Berlovitz, the evening is a jewel on display.
The performances are all excellent. Seifert takes this new view of Orgon as central focus and runs with it. Epp delivers a Tartuffe of cunning. It is impossible to like this character on any level as we observe his hypocrisy on stage. Warmanen delivers the appropriate comic timing of Dorine.
We are lucky to have a repertory of the quality of SCR in Orange County. For the last decade SCR has mostly focused on new plays and have been rewarded with national recognition. Personally I enjoy when they perform the classic plays. SCR in previous years would always include a play by Shakespeare, Shaw or Moliére in their season. Perhaps this production will put SCR back on that road in supplying audiences with productions of classics. Plays by those playwrights never date.

POETRY CORNER
Editor’s Note: This poetry feature will showcase original poems by members of the Creative Writers Club of Leisure World and other GRF members. The Poetry Workshop meets at 1:30 p.m. on the second Wednesday of the month in Clubhouse 3, Room 9.

Those Other Guys

Look in the mirror when you get up in the morning.
See someone there that you’re going to like all day.
See how a smile is left when you get through yawning.
Give it a chance to have its way.

Look in the mirror. You will see the whole world watching. Staring back at you through your own eyes.
If you can like the one you see, then you can like someone like me.
I’m one of them you call “those other guys.”

Acquaintances both old and new
Have deep concerns the same as you.
They each have dreams and hopes and fears,
And each one suffers heartaches too...

So look in the mirror. You’ll see your neighbors waiting,
Hoping for a cheerful friendly sign.
You’ll never find a better way to start off each and every day Than trading a smile of yours for one of mine.
—Patrick S. Coffee

HUI O HULA
Hui O Hula is LW’s Hawaiian dance club. Dancers meet twice a week for lessons and practice. Call 252-9676 or email jojo@huiohula.com for class information.
 May has been a busy month for the hula dancers.
So far they have performed at the LW Latin-American Club, Community Sing, Vietnamese- American Club, and Mutual 11’s election luncheon.
Performances outside of LW included Emeritus Health Centers in Anaheim and Garden Grove, Shoreline Healthcare Center in Long Beach as well as the Long Beach Senior Singles of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints. 
Fourteen dancers also ventured to Santa Fe Springs to dance an hour for the Neighborhood Center for its Hawaiian barbecue event. 
Every performance was fun and meaningful, and that is what Hui O Hula is all about.

LEISURE WHIRLERS
The Leisure Whirlers will have a Meet Me in St. Louis, Meet Me at the Fair dance Friday, June 6, in Clubhouse 4 from 6:30-9:30 p.m. Cost is $6. There will be music, dancing and an ice cream social potluck.
Bring a pint of ice cream and/or toppings to build an ice cream sundae. The potluck and socializing starts at 9 p.m. after the dancing. Pre-rounds are from 6:30-7 p.m. Square and round dances will be alternated from 7-9 p.m. There will be a singles rotation so everyone can dance. Parties are $6. For more information, call 237-2682.
A beginners round dance class, $5, is held Sunday from 5:30-6:45 p.m. Arrive at 5 p.m. for extra help. Classes are held at 5946 Westminster Blvd. at Springdale and Westminster in Westminster. Singles and couples are welcome. For information, call Mel Branham at (714) 803-0250.
Experienced square dancers are needed so everyone can dance at the class Mondays from 7:30-9:30 p.m. at the Garden Grove Women’s Club, 9501 Chapman Ave., in Garden Grove. Singles and couples are welcome. There is a singles rotation so everyone can dance. The ongoing beginners line dance class is also held Mondays from 5:30-7:30 p.m. at the same place. For information call Mel Branham.
Leisure Whirler Dance Club parties are held the first Friday of each month. The next one will be Friday, July 4. Singles and couples are welcome.

AMATEUR RADIO SERVICE CLUB
The Amateur Radio Service Club will meet from 10-11 a.m., Wednesday, June 4, in Clubhouse 3, Room 9.
The Radio Club wants members who want to make a difference. The club’s purpose is to provide emergency or disaster communications for the community.
“We want to help our community and we want to make a difference,” said club President Mike Clairmont. “We need boots on the ground, and we need brains in the radio room. Anyone can help. We have a radio related job for everyone.”
People do not need radio licenses. Volunteers are needed to start generators, operate hand-held radios, drive a van and other tasks that may be needed in the event of a disaster.
The club has Family Radio Service radios for people who do not have a ham radio license. HAM radio operators are also needed. For more information, contact Mike Clairmont, 860-0902.

ZYDECO CLASS
Whether it’s for celebration, exercise or socializing with others, studies have shown dancing changes brain chemistry by raising levels of endorphins, those special brain hormones that are linked to feelings of well-being and happiness.
Studies also show that people who dance are less likely to experience dementia and have sharper minds.
“Zydeco is the happiest music on earth,” says Zydeco dance instructor Karen Redding. Suffering from Epstein-barr and fibromyalgia when she first found Zydeco 20 years ago, Ms. Redding describes how she would get to a dance feeling pretty badly, but within 20 minutes she was feeling a lot better and happy.
Make new friends. Move a little. Get those endorphins going and get a weekly dose of happiness. Everyone is welcome to try the Zydeco dance class on Wednesdays at 3 p.m. in the lobby of Clubhouse 3; $5 per person per class.

DIXIELAND JAZZ BAND
The South Bay Dixie Jazz Band, hosted by the Dixieland Jazz Club, will feature guest banjo player Dick Serocky. The next concert will be held from 6:30-8:15 p.m., June 4, in Clubhouse 4.
For almost 10 years, the 9-piece South Bay Dixie Jazz Band, featuring four LW musicians, have entertained in LW. Many celebrity, professional and semi-professional musicians make guest appearances.
Members pay $5 for the year; guests, $2, per performance; there will be a 50/50 raffle. Bring friends, snacks and drinks. For more information, visit www.dixielandjazzclub.com.

PHOTO ARTS CLUB
The next meeting of the Photo Arts Club will feature discussion on aperture control. Cameras today feature a sophisticated automatic setting but many do not explore any other options. In this meeting, members will go beyond the “auto zone.” The meeting will cover how the aperature control setting can influence the creative quality of photos. All levels of photographers are invited to attend and learn a little more about their cameras. This will be a hands on meeting so bring cameras to the meeting Thursday, June 12, from 1:30-3 p.m. in Clubhouse 3, Room 9.

INTERNATIONAL FOLK DANCE— Circle dances have been danced in country villages for hundreds of years. They represent the feeling of community and camaraderie among members of the group. Leisure World folk dancers teach and practice circle dances, along with line and individual dances. The dancers meet every Friday at 10:30 a.m. in the lobby of Clubhouse 3. Visitors are welcome.

THE AMERICAN LEGION POST 327 and Auxiliary Post 327 hosted a moving Memorial Day observance May 26 in Clubhouse 2. The event featured keynote speaker Joseph Garcia, state commander, American Legion, Department of California (photo left) and performances by the Leisure World Orchestra (photo below) and the Leisure World Chorale (above). Legion Cmdr. Bud Sudbeck (seated on stage, photo left) introduced the speaker. There was a roll call of LW veterans to “Post Everlasting,” before buglar Lee Esslinger, first vice commander, played “Taps” at the 11th hour.