Dr. Haider Column

 

by Dr. Rudolph Haider

HCC Medical Director

 

It’s nice to give gifts to family members and friends. They appreciate the thoughtfulness, and people feel good about sharing their time, talents and efforts with loved ones. But there is one gift that is best not given to others, although it is sometimes unwittingly passed along. It’s the flu.

Influenza is a contagious virus that can cause severe illness and even life-threatening complications. Flu viruses can cause high fever, headache, fatigue, dry cough, sore throat, runny nose, and body aches.

Complications mayinclude bacterial pneumonia, dehydration, and aggravation of chronic medical conditions, such as congestive heart failure, asthma or diabetes. The flu spreads when an infected person coughs, sneezes or speaks, and the virus goes into the air and other people inhale it.

Every year, 10-20 percent of Americans get ill from the flu.

Most recover in one to two weeks, but approximately 200,000 people end up being hospitalized, and 36,000 die because of flu complications.

Those most likely to develop flu complications are children, adults 50 and older, women who are pregnant during flu season, individuals living in nursing homes or long-term-care facilities, people with chronic health conditions, health care workers who have direct patient contact, and care givers of children less than six months old.

The best way to prevent passing the flu to loved ones and others is to get a flu shot. The vaccine protects against three common viruses and usually becomes available this time of year. It may be given either as a shot or nasal spray, depending on the person’s age and existing health conditions.

The spread of the flu can also be prevented by avoiding close contact with people who are sick. Those who are sick should keep their distance from others.

Stay home from work, if possible and delay visiting friends and loved ones in the hospital while sick.

Good health habits are especially important during flu season, which typically lasts from about October through February.

Here are a few:

• People should cover their noses and mouths with a tissue when coughing or sneezing, then wash their hands. Alcohol-based sanitizers are good if soap and water are unavailable.

• Get plenty of sleep

• Stay active

• Manage stress

• Drink plenty of fluids

• Eat healthy foods to keep the immune system strong.

The flu is one thing that is best not shared with others. If you do get it, antiviral drugs may be taken to help make the illness milder and shorten the length of time you are sick.

For more information about the flu, talk with your HCC doctor.

 

Impaired Vision & Hearing Club

 

The Impaired Vision and Hearing Club will not meet until Dec. 10, when the annual holiday dinner will be presented at 12:30 p.m., in Clubhouse 4.

There is no cost for members, but $5 for all others. For reservations, call Margaret Putnam at 596-7046.

Linda Johnson and her crew will serve a turkey dinner with all the trimmings.

Musical entertainment will be provided  by Sam’s Twilight Strings.

The event is a great way to launch the joyous holiday season.

– Joan Shramek

Memory Screening

 

National memory screening day will be held from 9 a.m.-noon, Nov. 19, in the Health Care Center conference room.

The event is co-sponsored by the Alzheimer’s Foundation of America, Orange County Care Connections Outreach and Redeemer Respite Care.

Results will be kept confidential and are for informational purposes only.

All shareholders are invited, and there is no charge for the screenings.

For more information, call resident Rhonda Reed at 598-1267.

– Rhonda Reed

 

Senior Meals

 

Community SeniorServ (CSS) offers a weekly hot meals program at the North Seal Beach Community Center, 3333 St. Cloud Dr. The center opens at 9 a.m., Monday-Friday, for coffee. Lunch is served weekdays at 11:30. Arrive by 11 a.m. to register and find a seat. Sugar-free desserts are offered on request. Suggested donation, $3 for seniors 60 and older, $5 for all others. For more information, call 430-6079 between 9-11 a.m., Monday through Friday. Call 439-3699, to schedule free bus pick-up.

•••

The Los Alamitos senior lunch and bread program offers the same menu from 11:15-11:30 a.m. Monday-Friday at the Los Alamitos Youth Center, 10909 Oak St. Suggested donation: $3-$5 for seniors, $5 for people 59 or younger. For reservations, call Linda Klein at (562) 430-1073, ext. 526.

Monday, Nov. 18: Eggplant parmesan, three-way salad mix with vinaigrette, whole baby carrots, ice cream, fresh fruit, orange/pineapple juice.

Tuesday, Nov. 19: Tortilla soup, pork chili verde, pinto beans, sour cream, flour tortilla, diet custard.

Wednesday, Nov. 20: Vegetable soup, chicken breast with citrus glaze, orzo with vegetables, whole grain bread, fruit cocktail.

Thursday, Nov. 21: Cheeseburger on wheat bun with lettuce, tomato and sliced onions; potato salad, coleslaw, seasonal fresh fruit.

Friday, Nov. 22: Roast turkey and gravy, mashed potatoes, stuffing, green beans, cranberry sauce, roll, pumpkin pie with topping.

 

Health Care Center

 

by Terri Furlow, MS, RN

HCC Administrator

 

Dr. William Lee Parker, Ph.D., of Parker Hearing will discuss new technology in hearing aids at 1:30 p.m., Tuesday, Nov. 19, at the Health Care Center conference room.

The title of his presentation will be “Best Technology to Hear Better.”

Hearing loss is not deafness but a loss in the clarity of spoken speech without lip-reading or guessing.

•••

Ellen Kim, licensed clinical social worker (LCSW) from Hospice Care of California, will present a program on advanced directives at 10 a.m., Nov. 21, in the HCC conference room.

She will do the presentation in Korean.

Those who attend are requested to call the reservation line at 795-6204 and leave their names, numbers and which class they want to attend.

They should arrive 15 minutes early to assure their reservations.

After that, seats will be given away on a first-come-first served basis.

Weekly Activities

 

Living With Vision Loss

For people with failing vision, the group will meet from 10-11:30 a.m., tomorrow, Friday, in Clubhouse 3, Room 6.

Many helpful hints will be given out along with the names of organizations that can help.

The group is sponsored by the Impaired Vision and Hearing Club in conjunction with the Braille Institute.

For more information, call Sharon Kohn at 596-1969.

– Sharon Kohn

Movement for Health-Medical Qigong Club

The club is now meeting permanently in Clubhouse 3, Room 9, at 8 a.m. led by qigong practitioner Dave Heilig.

It’s a no-impact class with a focus on joint health, stress relief, pain reduction and wellness breathing techniques.Non-impact movements can be performed in a standing or seated position.

For more information, call 760-4545.

—Catherine Milliot

Monday Yoga

Classes are offered from 5:30-6:30 p.m., Mondays, in Clubhouse 4, Section C; fee: $5 per session.

For more information, call Pat Castaneda at 225-0273.

Yoga

Classes are offered Tuesdays at 10 a.m. in Clubhouse 4, Room A, Thursdays, 10 a.m., in Clubhouse 3, Room 1 and Saturdays, 10 a.m, in Clubhouse 3, Room 9. The fee is $5 per session.

For more information, call Glady Horbay at 308-7221.

– Glady Horbay

Alzheimer’s Support Group

The group for caregivers, sponsored by the Alzheimer’s Association, Orange County chapter, will meet in the Health Care Center conference room, from 10-11:30 a.m. Nov. 26.

It is the regular meeting of the group that meets on the fourth Tuesday of the month.

Co-facilitators will be Terri Furlow, HCC administrator and Ellie Nixon.

For more inmformation, call 795-6285

Yoga, Meditation, Tai Chi

Classes are offered from 9:30-11 a.m., Saturdays, in Clubhouse 6 upstairs.

Paul Pridanonda teaches students to free the mind and spirit using laughter, thought-sharing, and the slow and steady flow of tai chi movements.

A special meditation for relief, healing and energy ends the class.

For more information, contact Ron Kellet at 493-6719.

Line Dance

Classes are available for beginners at 10:30 a.m., Mondays, in Clubhouse 1. First-time beginners classes are scheduled at 10 a.m., Tuesdays, in Clubhouse 6, upstairs, and beginners to EZ level, 6 p.m., Tuesdays, Clubhouse 6, upstairs.

For more information, call Barbara Magie, 596-4690.

Pilates Club

Improve balance, strength and coordination with these no-impact, fun classes for men and women Thursdays in Clubhouse 6: a chair class at 5:30 p.m. for beginners and mat class at 6:45 for people experienced in pilates or yoga.

Classes, $7 each, are taught by certified pilates instructors.

For more information, call Susan Hopewell, 430-6044, or Linda Neer, 430-3214.

Low Impact Aerobic Classes

Classes taught by Sarah Grusmark are held Mondays and Thursdays from 9:30-10:30 a.m. in Clubhouse 1. The classes, designed for all fitness levels, will improve flexibility, strength and endurance.

For more information, call Cheryl Zimmer, 430-9379.

Upper Body Strength Class

One-hour classes are offered at 11:15 a.m., Tuesdays and Thursdays, in Clubhouse 6. The fee is $4 per class, payable at the start of the month, or $5 a class for those who do not attend regularly.

For more information, call 493-0609.

– Dorothy Anderson

Zumba Club

Zumba classes, $3 each, are available seven days a week. Saturday classes are at 11 a.m. Instructor is Stef Sullivan. Other classes: Sundays, 2:30 p.m.; Mondays, 6:30 p.m.; Tuesdays, 8:30 a.m.; Wednesdays, 5 p.m.; and Thursdays and Fridays, 8:30 a.m.

All classes are in Clubhouse 6 except Thursdays, when they are in Clubhouse 3. For more information, call 431-3199.

– Mary Romero

Stick, Qigong, Tai Chi Chih

Stick exercises, qigong and tai chi chih classes meet Tuesdays from 9:15-11 a.m. in Clubhouse 3, Room 1.

For more information, call Joann Mullens, 596-3936.

Walking Group

The group meets at 4 p.m. every Monday in front of the Amphitheater for a one-hour walk. The activity is not strenuous, but residents should check with their doctors if they have been recently ill.

Bad weather will cancel the walk. For more information, call 799-3841.

– Flo Dartt

Chair Exercise

Classes are held 9:30 a.m. every Tuesday and Friday in Clubhouse 1 for men and women at all fitness levels. Improve flexibility, strength, endurance and coordination.

A special meditation for relief, healing and energy ends the class.

For more information, call Janet Cord, 795-1836.

Tai chi and Qigong

Classes are held Mondays in Clubhouse 4, Room 3, right side.

At 9 a.m., instructional begins in tai chi, which helps with balance and has been taught in Leisure World since 1997. Qigong, a general health exercise, starts at about 9:45, followed by an explanation of the moves until 10:30.

For more information, call Jerry Cohen, instructor, at 596-7528.

– Jerry Cohen

Leisure Leggers

The Leisure Leggers, Leisure World’s walking and running club, meets every Monday at 8 a.m. in front of Clubhouse 6 for a 30-to-60-minute walk and to train for local races.

For more information, call Tom Pontac, club president, at 430-5777.

 

Wa-Rite

Vitamins are necessary for all the metabolic processes in the body.

Vitamin D was in the spotlight at the Nov. 8 meeting of the Wa-Rite Club when Patricia Cordray gave presentation on the three major vitamins, A, D, and E, all fat soluble vitamins.

They are chemical compounds needed in minute amounts and found in butter, milk, egg yolk, green vegetables and yellow fruit.

Ten minutes a day in the sun with the arms, face, and/or legs provides enough Vitamin D to be synthesized by the body.

New member Jackie McReynold was inducted into the club.

Billie Beveridge lost a remarkable eight pounds and became a bachelor of weight loss at her goal weight.

Linda Barisoff has lost 50 pounds since coming to Wa-Rite.

Members shed 50 pounds in October.

Mara Williams and Frances Rosenblatt lost 2-1/2 pounds to become the top losers last week.

•••

Reservations are required for the club’s holiday party Dec. 16 and can be made by calling Gloria Turley.

The topic at the meeting tomorrow, Friday, is how to eat healthy during the holidays.

– Betty Scharf

 

Long Beach Meals on Wheels

 

Meals on Wheels of Long Beach, Inc. (MOWLB) a non-profit group, delivers a variety of home-cooked meals to Leisure World shareholders. Cost, $6.50 per day, $32.50 per week. Meals are delivered between 10:30 a.m-12:30 p.m. Apply by phone or online. Contact Lisa Valdez at 433-0232 or visit www.mowlb.org. Call 439-5000 before noon to cancel orders for the following day. Menu subject to change without notification.

Monday, Nov. 18: Italian sausage gravy with pasta, zucchini, herb rice, spinach salad, roll, oatmeal cookie, chicken salad sandwich, lentil salad.

Tuesday, Nov. 19: Beef enchilada, pasta, pinto beans, corn, Ceasar salad, roll, pineapple, salami and cheese sandwich, Asian slaw.

Wednesday, Nov. 20: Seared talapia with orange sesame sauce, Asian vegetables, brown rice, mixed salad and roll, banana pudding, ham and cheese sandwich, carrot slaw.

Thursday, Nov. 21: Parmesan chicken, kidney beans, mixed vegetables, mixed salad and roll, peaches, egg salad sandwich, tomato and cucumber salad.

Friday, Nov. 22: Jamaican jerk pork, mashed sweet potatoes, green beans, mixed salad and roll, strawberry Jell-o, turkey and cheese sandwich, pasta salad.

 

Qi Gong

The Leisure World Qi Gong Club will present a workshop, “Being One with Your Food, The Healing Potential of the Foods We Eat,” from 11 a.m.-2 p.m., Nov. 16, in Clubhouse 3, Room 1.

It will be presented by David R. Heilig, a certified traditional Chinese medicine nutritionist, and medical Qi Gong practitioner.

Charge for the workshop will be $25 if registered before Nov. 8, or $30 at the door. Included in the fee is a study guide.

For more information or to pre-register, contact Catherine Milliot at 760-4545 or Kathy Moran, 596-0450.