ARTS June 12, 2014 SUNDAY NIGHT BALLROOM by Carol Robinson LW contributor
The Sunday Night Ballroom Dance Group will host two bands, the Golden Tones and Sam’s Twilight Strings at 5:30 p.m., June 22, in Clubhouse 4. Featured singers will include Carmen Edwards, Terry Humphrey and Sam Calderone. The music is basically “golden oldies” but also includes several line dances.
To make reservations for the $10 dinner, call 598-4056 or 430-2051 by Friday, June 20.
People who are coming for dancing only should plan to arrive by 7 p.m.
Singles and couples are welcome.

DANCE CLUB
Take a swing dance class from 5-6 p.m., Friday, June 20, in Clubhouse 4 before the Velvetones’ performance. Take a lesson, and stay to dance.
On Friday at 6:15 p.m., the class will learn rumba, and the 7:15 p.m. class will cover the Latin club dances.
The Dancing from the Heart and for the Heart class continues Wednesdays from 2-3 p.m. in the lobby of Clubhouse 3. Dance without a partner using basic dance steps. Dance steps will be taught in a line dance format.
Singles and couples are welcome; $5 per class per person. Instructor Jeremy Pierson is an experienced teacher.
For more information, contact Jeanine Greb, 296-5921.

PHOTO ARTS
The Photo Arts Club will meet from 1:30-3 p.m., today, June 12, in Clubhouse 3, Room 9. There will be a discussion on aperture control. Cameras today feature sophisticated automatic settings but many do not explore other options. The meeting will go beyond the “auto zone” by discussing and sharing examples of how the apperature control setting can influence the creative quality of photos.
All levels of photographers are invited to attend and learn more about their cameras. This will be a hands-on discussion, so bring camera.

SATURDAY A.M. DANCE
Candi Davis teaches dance classes at 9 and 10, Saturdays, in Clubhouse 1 for the Saturday Morning Dance Club. This month, she will teach the tango from 9-10 and country two-step from 10-11.
Dancers rotate, so partners are not required. People may attend one or both sessions, $5 each.

GRF WEEKLY DANCE
The Golden Rain Foundation sponsors a weekly dance on Saturdays from 7-10 p.m. in Clubhouse 1. Linda Herman will play.

PASTEL WORKSHOP
The Leisure World Art League will hold a pastel workshop from 1-3 p.m., Thursday, June 19, in the Art Room in Clubhouse 4. Carmen Leslie will teach. To reserve space and for more information, call Carmen at 430-6950.

LWERS PERFORM SATURDAY SHOWS AT AMPHITHEATER
During August, there will be three Saturdays to come and enjoy local Leisure World talent. The show schedule is as follows:
•Aug. 9: Dan & Mary Galliani and the Barbershop Singing Club
•Aug. 16: The Multicultural Council
•Aug. 30: The Leisure World Dixieland Jazz Club

THE COMPANY
Tommy Williams will open the evening with “Over the Rainbow,” with his mom Helen Schultz as “Dorothy” and their little dog Tea Cup as “Toto.” Everyone is welcome to attend a free open audition for an upcoming show for The Company at 6 p.m., Thursday, June 26, in Clubhouse 1. Talent must be there at 5 to check in, with first come, first on the stage. It’s like “an evening at the Improv.” Bring on the talent, and everyone in the community gets to enjoy it. Club organizers want to see LW dancers, singers, comics and magicians. Each act needs to be less than five minutes.
Steve Nichols, Sandi Post and Lynn R. Heath will make the selections. Tommy Williams is emcee for the evening will be there to help people with their acts.
It’s a happy hour so bring favorite beverages and snacks. There will be a 50/50 cash drawing.
The club will supply a CD player, mics, barstool along with mic stand and karaoke machine. For more information, contact Lynn at 296-5588 or lynnRheath@gmail.com.

GRF AMPHITHEATER
The Golden Rain Foundation is proud to present Amphitheater season 2014, which will begin Thursday, July 3, and end Thursday, Sept. 11. Shows begin at 8 p.m. until September when they will start at 7:30.
This year, three shows are designated as “popular,” as shown in bold print below. When a large audience is expected, GRF members will be limited to one non-resident guest. GRF identification is required.
The minibus will make a special evening run Thursdays to accommodate shareholders attending Amphitheater shows. See page 23 of the 2014 Minibus Schedule for more information. Handicap bus service is available by reservation. A bus will be waiting after the show to take passengers home.
The following is the show schedule:
•July 3: All American Boys Chorus
Rob Watkins, comedy host
•July 10: Count Basie Orchestra
Robert Lee, comedy host, sponsored by
CalMet Services Inc.
•July 17: ABBA Tribute
Steve Brunner, comedy host; sponsored by the
Los Alamitos Medical Center and the Health
Care Center on Golden Rain Road
•July 24: Kingston Trio, sponsored by John’s Landscaping
•July 31: Music in the Miller Mood, featuring Tex Beneke
Orchestra and the Modernaires
•Aug. 7: Debbie Reynolds, sponsored by Superwire
•Aug. 14: U.S. Navy Band, sponsored by the Y’s Service Club
•Aug. 21: The Rat Pack
•Aug. 28: Frankie Avalon
•Sept. 4: Country-western Tribute to Roy Orbison & Patsy Cline
Kelly McDonald, comedy host; sponsored by
the Golden Age Foundation
•Sept. 11: Terry Otte & Abilene

SCIENCE DISCUSSION
The Science Discussion Club will discuss history of science in the western world from 2-3:15 p.m., June 12, in Clubhouse 3, Room 3. The club will examine the history and developments of the Scientific Revolution, specifically the work of Sir Isaac Newton.
The club meets on the second and fourth Thursdays of the month in Clubhouse 3, Room 3. The next meeting is June 26. There are no dues or membership requirements.
For more information, call Mark Barnett, 430-2435.

POETRY WORKSHOP
Editor’s
Note: This poetry feature will showcase original poems by members of the Creative Writers Club of Leisure World and other GRF members. The Poetry Workshop meets at 1:30 p.m. on the second Wednesday of the month in Clubhouse 3, Room 9.

I—
Seven alley cats
Marching on the faded boards
Howling at the moon

II—
Desert roads are bleak
But halfway to Las Vegas is
An ancient lava bed

III—
Deep inside my soul
On a windy, autumn night
I found a single pearl

IV—
Winter’s icy wind
Slices through my folded arms,
Never warm again.

V—
Spider spins her web
In the dusty, prickly bush
Then the rain begins

VI—
Haikus are so tedious
Written to a strict rhyme set
They don’t even rhyme

—Pat Lay Wilson

SINGERS AUDITIONS
Valentino Perry, LW entertainer, will hold auditions at 6 p.m., Monday, June 16, in Clubhouse 1 for people who want to sing like professionals.
Bring sheet music or a CD. A pianist and karaoke machine will be available. Valentino will select six singers to coach on Mondays, from 6-8, in Clubhouse 1.

LEISURE WHIRLERS
The Leisure Whirlers will have an Independence Day dance Friday, July 4, in Clubhouse 4 from 6:30-9:30 p.m. Cost is $6. There will be music, dancing and a finger-food potluck.
Pre-rounds are from 6:30-7 p.m. Square and round dances will be alternated from 7-9 p.m. There will be a singles rotation so everyone can dance.
For more information, call 237-2682.
A beginners round dance class, $5, is held Sunday from 5:30-6:45 p.m. Arrive at 5 p.m. for extra help. Classes are held at 5946 Westminster Blvd. at Springdale and Westminster in Westminster. Singles and couples are welcome. For information, call Mel Branham at (714) 803-0250.
A beginners square dance class is held Mondays from 7:30-9:30 p.m. at the Garden Grove Women’s Club, 9501 Chapman Ave., in Garden Grove. Singles and couples are welcome. There is a singles rotation so everyone can dance. The ongoing beginners line dance class is also held Mondays from 5:30-7:30 p.m. at the same place. For information call Mel Branham.
Leisure Whirler Dance Club parties are held the first Friday of each month.

KARAOKE CLUB
When you’ve been married 50 years like karaoke singer Byong Choi and his wife, Yong, it calls for an anniversary party, which was the highlight of last week’s Community Karaoke. Performers serenaded the couple with love songs. As a special treat, the Choi’s daughters and sons-in-law strummed their guitars and sang to the group.
The anniversary couple provided wonderful refreshments for their new friends in Leisure World. They have only lived here about one year. It was a memorable occasion and everyone congratulated them.
There were about 40 entertainers singing a variety of tunes. There was waving of the arms to the music and dancing, the enjoyment of the dinner, laughter and friendships.
All are welcome next Wednesday in Clubhouse 1 from 5:30.

LEISURE TIME DANCERS
Leisure Time Dancers will continue rumba and tango lessons in June. The class meets on Mondays. Rumba is at 2 p.m. and tango, at 3 in Clubhouse 6. For more information, call 434-6334.

AMPHITHEATER RULES
The Golden Rain Foundation is proud to present the Amphitheater Season for this year, which will begin Thursday, July 3, and end Thursday, Sept. 11. Shows will begin at 8 p.m. until September when they begin at 7:30. See the show schedule on this page and online at www.lwsb.com for more information.
To ensure an enjoyable season for everyone, people are asked to adhere to the following rules for the Amphitheater shows:
•No video or audio taping of performers. This could result in the performer walking off the stage and canceling the show.
•Do not save seats. Amphitheater seating is available on a first come, first served basis.
•Do not sing along with performers unless asked to do so by the performer on stage.
•Dancing is only allowed in the upper patio areas to the right or left of the Amphitheater seating area.
•All guests must be accompanied by a resident with a Golden Rain Foundation photo identification card.
•The number of non-resident guests will be limited to one per GRF member when a program is considered popular and will attract a large audience. Residents will be required to show their member photo identification card when entering the Amphitheater for these popular shows.
•No one is allowed to sit or stand in the aisles. It is against fire regulations.
•No smoking is permitted in the Amphitheater area. (GRF Policy 1412.2)
•Lower flags on scooters so people can see the stage.
•Walkers should be left in the aisle; do not take walkers to the seating area.
•Handicap seating is at street level where the blue handrails are located at the middle of the Amphitheater.
•No pets are allowed at the Amphitheater (GRF Policy 1023).

AMPHITHEATER POLICY CHANGE
Policy 5562, Amphitheater Programs, now states that when a program is expected to draw a large audience, GRF members will be limited to one non-resident guest and must show GRF identification cards. Caregivers may not attend Amphitheater programs unless they are on duty and accompanied by their employer/foundation member. Caregiver badges must be worn.
This season, three shows will be limited to one guest:
•July 24, Kingston Trio
•Aug. 7, Debbie Reynolds
•Aug. 28, Frankie Avalon
For more information, call Terry DeLeon, GRF recreation supervisor, 431-6586, ext. 350.

COMPUTER CLUB
by John Fuhrer
LW contributor

The Leisure World Computer Lab, operated under the auspices of the LW Computer Club, is open and free to all LW residents.
The hours of operation are Monday through Friday from 1-3 p.m.
The Computer Lab is located on the ground floor of Clubhouse 5 next door to the new Downtown Cafe.
The computer lab has free 24-hour Wi-Fi service, which is also available to anyone sitting inside the Café or within the clubhouse lobby.
The lab has nine Windows 7 PC computers, three document scanners, two printers and one black-and-white copier.
The computer lab is set up for handicap access.
So come in and meet a friendly lab coordinator who is glad to help people get started.

THEATER CLUB
The Leisure World Theater Club will perform an evening of song, dance and comedy at 7 p.m., Aug. 29, in Clubhouse 4. The theme will be “The Good Old Days.”
Theater Club members are urged to attend an open audition on Monday, June 23, at 1 p.m. in the Loft. A variety of performers will be needed, especially those who enjoy singing/acting with others. Parts must be memorized.
The club is pleased to announce that Alice Lemon will direct the non-musical performances and Steve Nichols will be the musical director. The club is pleased to have the help of these two professional people.

POETRY CORNER
This
poetry feature showcases original poems by members of the Creative Writers Club of Leisure World and other GRF members.

ANOTHER DAY

Another day I didn’t feel the sun
Another day my mind was on the run.
And one more time
I watched my day slip by
And one more time
I didn’t touch the sky.

Another night I didn’t see the moon.
Another night my tears were a monsoon.
And once again
I didn’t feel your touch
And once again
I had no rose to clutch
(I wanted oh so much…)

Another dream had to be put to sleep
Another dream had to be buried deep.
And yet again,
I rose to fight and give
And yet again,
I chose to smile and live.

—Lia Gaspar

LW CHORALE
Leisure World Chorale members will tip their hats to Ol’ Blue Eyes, Frank Sinatra, during the next concert at 2 p.m., Saturday, June 21, in Clubhouse 4. They have “High Hopes” that they’ll see the ant move the rubber tree plant. Frank Sinatra sang about love and so will the Chorale. Members will feature the songs that Frank made famous, including “Without A Song,” “How High the Moon,” “How Do You Keep the Music Playing?,” “A Lovely Way to Spend an Evening,” the sad “Here’s That Rainy Day,” “All The Way,” “Blame It On My Youth,” “That’s All,” “The Best Is Yet To Come,” “High Hopes,” “My Kind of Town,” “Chicago,” “The House I Live In” and his most famous signature songs, “New York, New York” and “My Way.”
Individual members will perform their favorites that Frank Sinatra made famous. Come a little early June 21 to get a good seat.

ORCHID SOCIETY
The South Coast Orchid Society will meet at 7 p.m., Monday, June 23, at the Whaley Park Clubhouse located at 5620 E. Atherton Street (near Bellflower and Atherton) in Long Beach.
Harry Phillips of Andy’s Orchids in Encinitas is presenting the program.
There will be a silent auction, plant opportunity table and refreshments.
All orchid hobbyists and lovers are invited to attend.
For more information, call 431-5090.
The South Coast Orchid Society is a non-profit organization.

LW LIBRARY
The Leisure World Library proudly presents Craig MacDonald, the first author of its summer AuthorSpeak! program, at 11 a.m., Wednesday, June 25, on the covered patio at the library.
A Pulitzer Prize nominee, Craig is the author of 18 books on the West. He will speak on how “The Gold Rush is Still with Us Today,” explaining how it is relevant in language, food, fashion, business and diversity.
A member of Phi Alpha Theta, the National History Honor Society, Craig will share about current gold-mining operations in California and Nevada that are producing billions of dollars in gold. He will also explain where people can mine for gold today.
He has a natural interest in history via his family connections, beginning with a great-grandmother who came to California from Iowa in a covered wagon during the Gold Rush to a grandfather, who mined the Sierra mountains. Craig grew up loving the Golden State and has devoted his life to researching its history, writing and collecting stories for all generations and sharing his passion for California.
This is Craig’s second visit to the Leisure World Library.
Light refreshments, hosted by the Leisure World Friends of the Library, will be served.

CABARET ENTERTAINERS
Cabaret Entertainers incoming President Tommy Williams and outgoing President Bob Fritz donated $300 to the Golden Age Foundation. The Cabaret Entertainers is a small club that puts on mostly free nightclub shows in Leisure World.
The club accumulated some extra money from a fund raiser and wanted to share it with the GAF, Mr. Fritz stated.
“I’m so excited and proud of the quality of the performances our Cabaret Entertainers work so hard to achieve,” he said. “I’m also excited that one of our great performers is stepping into my position and will do a great job of moving forward. Tommy has not only great talent, but great pride in our club and will be a great leader of the exceptional talent the club has.”
Club members have solid professional backgrounds, including Bert Carroll who has a gold record award for a song he wrote for Elvis Presley. He and Fransua Francour were in their own bands that performed in Las Vegas and around the country. Other top club entertainers are the versatile Ric Dizon, Broadway-style performer Bette Fritz, and night club singer Linn Atkinson. The club members work together as a team to help each other improve their performances to achieve their maximum potential and bring Leisure Worlders consistently great shows. The date of the next performance will soon be announced.

CHEKOV SHORTS
“Chekov Shorts: The Proposal and The Bear” will open this weekend at the Long Beach Playhouse’s the Studio Theatre.
Diane Benedict is the the director and has translated these two one-act plays from Russian to English.
She has interspersed in the middle of these two pieces an adaptation (again her translation) of one of Chekov’s short stories, “The Bet,” that she turned into another one-act play. She chose these three pieces because of their vaudevillian nature.
Chekov tends to be associated with his more serious plays such as “The Three Sisters,” “The Seagull,” “The Cherry Orchard,” among others, but he wrote rich comedies that are exemplified in this production.
The setting for “The Bear” is in the Ural Mountains on November 14, 1880. “The Proposal” is set near Moscow on Nov.13, 1885, and “The Bet,” set in St. Petersburg, spans the years from 1870-1885.
Diane is a professor of theatre arts at Loyola Marymount University with a specialty in Stanislavski and Russian theatre. She first got interested in Russian theater, and Chekov specifically, while taking an acting class from Darryl Hickman (brother of Duane Hickman of Dobie Gillis fame). Darryl asked her to prepare one of Sonja’s monologues from Uncle Vanya. She was hooked because of the subtext, the balance of comedy and pathos, and the internal conflict that Chekov characters endure.
In 1989, she was chosen to represent UCLA (during her MFA program) at the Podium Theatre Festival in Moscow and spent a month in Moscow.
In 2004, Diane received a Fulbright Award and was able to return to Russia to continue her studies and learn the language. For her, reading Russian is much easier than speaking it. Since plays are all dialogue, the challenge for Diane was to be able to use Russian colloquialisms in translating the “Chekov Shorts” to make the dialogue as authentic as possible.
Diane hopes the audience walks away with questions and that they will search for their own answers. This is a very Russian point of view. In contrast, in German theater, the expectation is for a clear vision with specific outcomes. This Chekov quote sums up the Russian point of view: “The role of the artist is to ask questions, not to answer them.”
The following is the show schedule:
•Pay-What-You-Can. Thursday, June 12: The community can see this production for whatever they can afford
•Two-for-One Preview, Friday, June 13: Tickets are $12
•Opening Night champagne reception with cast on June 14; Tickets are $27
•General admission: Adults: $24; seniors, $21; and students $14. Tickets are available at www.lbplayhouse.org or by calling 494-1014, option 1. “Chekov Shorts: The Proposal and The Bear” will open this weekend at the Long Beach Playhouse’s the Studio Theatre.
Diane Benedict is the the director and has translated these two one-act plays from Russian to English.
She has interspersed in the middle of these two pieces an adaptation (again her translation) of one of Chekov’s short stories, “The Bet,” that she turned into another one-act play. She chose these three pieces because of their vaudevillian nature.
Chekov tends to be associated with his more serious plays such as “The Three Sisters,” “The Seagull,” “The Cherry Orchard,” among others, but he wrote rich comedies that are exemplified in this production.
The setting for “The Bear” is in the Ural Mountains on November 14, 1880. “The Proposal” is set near Moscow on Nov.13, 1885, and “The Bet,” set in St. Petersburg, spans the years from 1870-1885.
Diane is a professor of theatre arts at Loyola Marymount University with a specialty in Stanislavski and Russian theatre. She first got interested in Russian theater, and Chekov specifically, while taking an acting class from Darryl Hickman (brother of Duane Hickman of Dobie Gillis fame). Darryl asked her to prepare one of Sonja’s monologues from Uncle Vanya. She was hooked because of the subtext, the balance of comedy and pathos, and the internal conflict that Chekov characters endure.
In 1989, she was chosen to represent UCLA (during her MFA program) at the Podium Theatre Festival in Moscow and spent a month in Moscow.
In 2004, Diane received a Fulbright Award and was able to return to Russia to continue her studies and learn the language. For her, reading Russian is much easier than speaking it. Since plays are all dialogue, the challenge for Diane was to be able to use Russian colloquialisms in translating the “Chekov Shorts” to make the dialogue as authentic as possible.
Diane hopes the audience walks away with questions and that they will search for their own answers. This is a very Russian point of view. In contrast, in German theater, the expectation is for a clear vision with specific outcomes. This Chekov quote sums up the Russian point of view: “The role of the artist is to ask questions, not to answer them.”
The following is the show schedule:
•Pay-What-You-Can. Thursday, June 12: The community can see this production for whatever they can afford
•Two-for-One Preview, Friday, June 13: Tickets are $12
•Opening Night champagne reception with cast on June 14; Tickets are $27
•General admission: Adults: $24; seniors, $21; and students $14. Tickets are available at www.lbplayhouse.org or by calling 494-1014, option 1

HUI O HULA
Hui O Hula meets upstairs in Clubhouse 6 on Mondays at 10 a.m. and Tuesdays at 1:15 p.m. for Hawaiian dance classes. Those who are interested in learning the hula can call 252-9676 or email jojo@huiohula.com for more information. If there is enough interest, a class for beginners can be organized for this summer.
 This week Hui dancers will perform at St. Olaf Church in Garden Grove for the Cancer Survivors’ Program on June 14, Salvation Army Home League June 16, and Karlton Residential Care in Anaheim during the week.
Hui O Hula dancers are also looking forward to entertaining the graduating class of Agnes L. Smith Elementary School in Huntington Beach Thursday, June 19.
The hula program will complete its Polynesian theme party.
—Jojo Weingart


INTERNATIONAL FOLK DANCE—Folk dancers hold a map of the world which symbolizes the goal of the group: to learn and practice the dances of the world. This includes being able to listen to beautiful music of many countries. The club meets every Friday morning at 10:30 in the lobby of Clubhouse 3.  Dancers of any skill level are invited, and visitors are welcome.

GERARDE PRODUCTIONS
by Gerarde Imhoff
LW contributor

Gerarde’s Productions will present an evening of song stylings with Gerarde Imhoff at 7 p.m., June 27, in Clubhouse 4.
Doors open at 6 p.m.
Gerarde sings with various groups in Leisure World.
He will present a program featuring the music of Sinatra, Nat King Cole, Elvis, Johnny Cash and other greats.
There will be a 50/50 drawing at the close of the evening. Everyone is invited to attend, and admission is free.

FIDDLER ON THE ROOF
Revisit the little village of Anatevka, as Tevye, a poor dairyman, tries to instill in his five daughters the traditions of his tight-knit Jewish community in the face of changing social mores and the growing anti-Semitism of Czarist Russia.
The Biola Youth Theater will present “Fiddler on the Roof”at Sutherland Hall at Biola University, 13800 Biola Ave., La Mirada, 90639. Show dates and times are: June 12, 7:30 p.m.; June 13, 7:30 p.m.; June 14, 1:30 and 7:30 p.m.; June 19, 7:30 p.m.; June 20, 7:30 p.m.; and June 21, 1:30 and 7:30 p.m. Call 906-4574 for more information.
The enduring musical features such acclaimed songs as “Sunrise, Sunset,” “If I Were A Rich Man” and “Matchmaker,” to name a few.