Travel Bowers
LWers take advantage of free admission Sunday
by Leila Claudio
LW contributor
The first Sunday of the month is free admission at the Bowers Museum, which usually charges an entrance fee of $15 for adults, $12 for seniors.  
Three friends, Jovita Smith, Josephine Law and Leila Claudio ,sampled the museum’s bounty.
First, they checked out an exhibition by Chuck Jones, best known for the vivid characters he brought to life in more than 250 cartoons like Bugs Bunny, Daffy Duck, the Roadrunner and Pepe le Pew, among others.  He received three Oscars for his work. 
Next came the animal mummies.  The ancient Egyptians saw animals as creatures created by the gods and believed animals possessed a soul.  Animal images were used in writing, magic or healing.  Danger was controlled by harnessing the powers of a ferocious animal, for example, in marshy areas, the crocodile god, Sobek, ruled. Bull mummies were buried with early kings, because they were associated with strength and fertility.
The lure of Chinatown beckoned.  The picturesque paintings tried to document what life was like in the Chinatowns of San Francisco and Los Angeles in the 1930s, while skipping over the anti-Chinese sentiment and legislation suffered by them.  The ladies found the paintings to be aesthetically pleasing.
Outside, plain white parasols were offered for $3. The idea was to decorate the parasol with magic markers to make artwork uniquely one’s own.
The art of tai chi followed, which are movements based on martial arts, promoting circulation to the blood vessels at its farthest end. It is especially effective for the older population due to lack of activities, and those who experience numbness from diseases like diabetes.  
A practice session ensued with Leila being picked as one of the participants.
Finally, the flamenco dancers were introduced.  The leader talked about “jaleos,” words of encouragement when a move is particularly exciting.
“Ole” or “guapa”(charming) are examples. “Palmas” or clapping is different from the clapping used to applaud. Palmas are for rhythm, with the dancer counter-clapping (contra-palma) and tapping her shoes. The beat of the guitar, the palmas and the jaleos of ‘oles’ made the heart beat with exhilaration.
Visit the Bowers Museum, located at 2002 N. Main St. in Santa Ana, telephone (714) 567-3600.

Natchez Trace
LWers travel on beautiful historical road
by Barbara Houck
LW contributor
The 440-plus mile trip in the spring from Natchez, Miss., to Nashville, Tenn., was one more thing off our “Someday” list. There are no billboards, stop signs, phone or electric wires, and with a 50-mile an hour speed limit, it is one of the most beautiful and historic drives in the U.S.  
It took us about two weeks, only four actual days, on the Trace, with all the side trips we took.  
A great lunch at Natchez Under the Hill, historic mansions, back to Louisiana for Duck Commander and Poverty Point pre-historic mounds were some of the highlights near Natchez.  
In Vicksburg, Miss., it was the National Military Park, museums and genealogy. 
The dogwoods were blooming everywhere. 
At the end of the trace is the famous Loveless Café.  
One suggestion, do not try the Trace near Nashville on the weekends. It abounds with bicycles. And on a two lane road with lots of curves and bicycles going both ways, drivers sometimes find themselves traveling the speed of a bicycle until they have a clear view ahead.
Photo— NATCHEZ TRACE PARKWAY is a wilderness road through exceptional scenery and 10,000 years of North American history. Used by American Indians, traders, soldiers, “Kaintucks,” settlers, slaves, outlaws and more, the Old Natchez Trace played an important role in American history.

Traveling Tigers
Amazon River slides will be shown
The Traveling Tigers Club will meet Wednesday, June 18, in Clubhouse 3, Room 9, at noon.
Chuck Sones will lead the Pledge of Allegiance and the meal prayer.    
Following the cold salad potluck, a short business meeting will be conducted by President Carolyn Boodman.
The program, at approximately 1:15 p.m., will feature Eleanor Clark showing her slides of the Amazon River and villages located along the side.
Annual membership is $3. Contact Carolyn, 594-6960, for further information.

JFTB
LWers tour training base
by Anna Derby
LW contributor
I’ve been curious about what goes on behind our community and decided to take a tour of the Los Alamitos Joint Forces Training Base (JFTB) when it was offered last month.
It was scorching hot as Michael Oh and I passed through the gate, after showing our government issued identification cards.We were lead to the orientation room and told about the itinerary for the day. We saw a dozen familiar faces from Leisure World, and it made the entire trip, over two hours, more fun.
The
 Los Al Chamber of Commerce Regional Military Affairs Committee conducts the tours, and Tom Lasser, from the Chamber of Commerce gave the orientation.
After the orientation we boarded a used military bus, without air conditioning. Oh well, they try to save tax dollars, so let’s not blame them, but it was hot.
There were a little over 30 people who headed to the military facilities, including the banquet and dining rooms. We were told anyone could use the facilities for any occasion. The room looks very nice to have a special event with an experienced chef on duty.
We visited the airfield and got into a Black Hawk combat helicopter. We were so excited to sit in the pilot’s seat. We climbed in and out like children at playground imagining what we would’ve done during the war to save soldiers.
The last stop was the indoor laser range. A couple officers showed us what to do and how to score.
We both took a turn, without real ammunition, and didn’t get a good score at all.
Thanks to Chief Warrant Officer Tom Murphy who briefed us with a sense of dry humor, and made us feel at home even though we were at a military base.
He showed us the archive photos of Los Alamitos and Rossmoor before JFTB was built on the 1,400-acre parcel.
We were reminded that JFTB is an important part of our community. It is a full-service joint military training center, airfield and California Disaster Support Area, servicing a wide variety of military, government and public interests. It makes assets available to the nation and state in the event of a regional disaster or emergencies. The JFTB has a daily average of 850 employees (military, civil services and contractors) and supports 3,000-plus citizen soldiers in the California National Guard, the U.S. Army Reserves and the U.S. Marine Corps Reserves.
As we finished the day-trip and said good-bye, we thanked them for protecting us. We feel safe having them close to our neighborhood.
—Anna Derby

On the Go
“Grease” Lawrence Welk Theater —
June 18, $92, New York Club, Los Alamitos Seniors’ Club, Phyllis Pierce, 598-3743; Chee Chee Porr, 430-5949; or Verna Burns, 596-1896.
“Jersey Boys” Segerstrom Center — July 8, $105, New York Club, Los Alamitos Seniors’ Club, Phyllis Pierce, 598-3743; Chee Chee Porr, 430-5949; or Verna Burns, 596-1896.
Pala Casino —Aug. 15, $6, American Legion Post 327, Tony Dodero, 430-5828.
Del Mar Horse Races — Aug. 27, $70 with lunch, New York Club, Los Alamitos Seniors’ Club, Phyllis Pierce, 598-3743; Chee Chee Porr, 430-5949; or Verna Burns, 596-1896.
Oak Glen— Oct. 22, $61, New York Club, Los Alamitos Seniors’ Club, Phyllis Pierce, 598-3743; Chee Chee Porr, 430-5949; or Verna Burns, 596-1896.
Los Angeles Chocolate Tour — Nov. 12, $88, New York Club, Los Alamitos Seniors’ Club, Phyllis Pierce, 598-3743; Chee Chee Porr, 430-5949; or Verna Burns, 596-1896.
Mission Inn Holiday Spectacular — Dec. 17, $84 with dinner, New York Club, Los Alamitos Seniors’ Club, Phyllis Pierce, 598-3743; Chee Chee Porr, 430-5949; or Verna Burns, 596-1896.
Harrah’s Rincon — Daily, free, Amphitheater, 7:15-7:30 a.m., (877) 777-2457.
Pala Casino — Thursdays, free, $5 back in slot play, Amphitheater, 7:30 a.m., reservations needed, (714) 283-8687.
Pechanga Casino — Daily, Amphitheater, 8 a.m., free, $10 in EZ Play upon arrival, (951) 770-2579.
Valley View Casino — Daily, Amphitheater, 7:45 a.m., $6, $15 back in slots.
Overnight Trips
Yosemite, Amtrak— June 16-18, New York Club, Phyllis Pierce, 598-3743, or Chee Chee Porr, 430-5949.
Laughlin, Riverside Resort— June 22-25, New York Club, Los Alamitos Seniors’ Club, Phyllis Pierce, 598-3743; Chee Chee Porr, 430-5949; or Verna Burns, 596-1896.
Laughlin, Edgewater — July 20-23, New York Club, Los Alamitos Seniors’ Club, Phyllis Pierce, 598-3743; Chee Chee Porr, 430-5949; or Verna Burns, 596-1896.
San Francisco, Wine Country— July 31-Aug. 3, New York Club, Phyllis Pierce, 598-3743, or Chee Chee Porr, 430-5949.
Laughlin, Riverside Resort Luau— Aug. 4-6, New York Club, Los Alamitos Seniors’ Club, Phyllis Pierce, 598-3743; Chee Chee Porr, 430-5949; or Verna Burns, 596-1896.
Zion, Valley of Fire, Cedar Breaks, Mesquite, Las Vegas — Sept. 29-Oct. 2, motorcoach tour, Traveling Tigers Club, Joanna Matos 598-1849.
Albuquerque and Santa Fe, N.M.— Sept. 28-Oct. 4, Passport to Adventure, Jazmin Bilby, 925-3144 or 715-6282.
New Mexico, Albuquerque Balloon Festival — Oct. 5-14, New York Club, Los Alamitos Seniors’ Club, Phyllis Pierce, 598-3743; Chee Chee Porr, 430-5949; or Verna Burns, 596-1896.

Around Town
• Water Wise Know-How— Become a water wise wizard Saturday, June 21, at 2:30 p.m. at the Orange County Library, 5331 Orange Ave., Cypress, CA, 90630, Community Room. Robert Shaw, a member and past president of the Orange County Independent Master Gardeners, will share his knowledge and expertise in lawn and garden water conservation. For more information, call (714) 826-0350.
• KRON Medieval Martial Arts—Learn how knights and soldiers really used swords in history, at a live demonstration of historical European martial arts presented by KRON of Fullerton. The free demonstration will be on the green area in front of the Cypress Library, 5331 Orange Ave., Cypress, CA, 90630, on Sunday, June 29, at 2:30 p.m. For more information, call the Cypress Library at (714) 826-0350.