Outside the Wall Column by Les H. Cohen, Mutual 15 Legislative Advocate Emeritus/ OC Ombudsman
Some of the bills that the California legislature approved were recently signed into law from the 2013 session by Gov. Jerry Brown, several of which are of interest to shareholders:
They include:
• Assembly bill (AB) 23. It’s a misdemeanor to store a loaded firearm where it may be accessible to minors.
• AB 140. Changes the definition of “undue influence” to mean excessive persuasion that causes another person to act or refrain from acting by overcoming that person’s free will and results in inequity. It hanges the definition of a crime.
• AB 1217. Enacts the Home Care Services Protection Act, registration/background check, etc.
• Senate bill (SB) 135. To build and maintain an early warning earthquake system that will give Californians 60 seconds to secure coverage.
• SB 543. Will impose a longer sentence on criminals who target seniors by treating elder theft the same as any other theft.
•••
Residential Care Facilities for the Elderly (RCFE) Reform Act of 2014 bills introduced:
• SB 894. Would create timelines for the safe relocation of residents when a facility’s license has been suspended or revoked.
• SB 895. Would require community care licensing to conduct unannounced, comprehensive inspections of all residential care facilities for the elderly at least annually, and as often as necessary to ensure the quality of care provided.
• AB 2171. Would create a statutory, comprehensive, modern bill of rights for those who live in residential care facilities for the elderly and give the attorney general, residents, or the public the right to seek injunctive relief to stop violations of residents’ rights.

Letters to the Editor

Editor:
Regarding the offensive letter (GR News Feb. 20) concerning Valentino Perry, remember, we are a community, and from time-to- time are asked to contribute our skills and talent for entertainment and not the critique of those in attendance.
I think the letter was cruel and insensitive and should have never been printed.
Some of us were previously in the entertainment business and this might be all we have left. So when we are asked to perform, come out and see us.
If you’re not happy with the performance, I’m sorry, but don’t go home and write a letter about someone trying to offer a few minutes of entertainment.Very petty.
Vern Jackson
Mutual 4
Editor:
In response to the couple who gave an opinion of the Valentino & Friends performance: Like all the performances you will see and hear in Leisure World, they are made up of friends having some fun and joining their talents to please an audience.
They plan, rehearse, laugh and enjoy themselves and always try their best to do well.
We in Leisure World have a variety of events to attend and they are usually free of charge. If we don’t enjoy it, we don’t have to show up.
Let’s be a kinder, gentler community, after all, we are neighbors.
Margie Thompson
Mutual 11
Editor:
In response to the letter from Sylvia Volen (The News Feb. 27) ) I was reminded that someone once said “be careful what you write as it reflects how you live your life.”
Sylvia certainly is entitled to the facts, but not her own facts. I remember that our late President, the Honorable Ronald Reagan once said: “Good stories will always trump the facts.”
Instead of accusing the entire California elected legislature of “unsupported/alleged” corruption,” she would be well-advised to exercise the rights she was granted by the first amendment to the Constitution to petition the government for redress of (her) grievances. No government may abridge those rights as it is the cornerstone of American democracy in its finest form.
Sylvia might read the column by the distinguished veteran political reporter George Skelton in the Los Angeles Times (Feb. 27, page A2) and respond by exercising her rights by speaking/writing in support of his conclusion. She should keep in mind that a French statesman once said “the health of a democratic society is achieved by the quality/quantity of actions performed by private citizens.
In my opinion, it’s the right thing to do.
Les H. Cohen, Mutual 15
Legislative Advocate Emeritus
Editor:
There was a long and detailed discussion at the Feb. 25 Golden Rain Foundation open board meeting regarding the road class designation to be applied to Golden Rain Road (fire lane, Z or slightly less demanding no parking, including the ramifications such designations entail). The GRF President referred the issue back to the Physical Property committee to finalize a path to GRF resolution.
Ultimately, it will be up to Mutuals 1, 2, 4, and 5 to effect whatever resolution results.
This shareholder is led to believe the middle ground is the least demanding finding that provides a reasonable degree of convenience to those bordering Golden Rain Road (loading and unloading) and a rational degree of emergency vehicle access. Public policy demands no more.
In any end analysis the fire fighting service and ambulance agencies will find their way to serve the public. It’s their mission and they fulfill it well.
Stan Verdi
Mutual 2
Editor:
I don’t care what bus ridership figures anyone looks at. Look at the buses, they’re empty. I’m serious. Anytime a bus passes by, look and see if there are more than two riders.
When I play golf and walk up Golden Rain Road towards St. Andrews Drive, I look at every bus that passes. When I walk my dog, I look at every bus that passes; they are empty.
But it doesn’t cost that much, some say, so why change anything? I’m not concerned with the cost, my concern is that the service we provide is not meeting shareholders’ needs.
When was the last time we had a professional evaluation of our bus service? Have we ever had one? Can we ask our shareholders what they need without alarming them that we are going to take something away or charge them more? How can we better serve our shareholders?
Our GRF board has a fiduciary responsibility to spend our money wisely. They are not meeting that responsibility. If they would just stop micro-managing the present and plan for our future, we might have a better bus service.
Where is this resistance to planning coming from? Why is planning a dirty word? We don’t need empty buses, we need a plan to fill them up.
Anne Walshe
Mutual 9

Mutual Director’s Column

by Barry Lukoff
Mutual 14

Franklin McCain died a few weeks ago. No, he was not a resident of Leisure World, but on Feb. 1, 1960, Franklin and three other young men sat down at a Woolworth’s lunch counter in Greensboro, N. C.
They knew they would not be served, but what Franklin wanted was to give notice that he was trying to achieve the rights and privileges he was due.
Later, when asked why he and his friends chose that action he said that they had asked themselves a question: “ At what point does a moral man act against injustice?”
I tell this story because of several current injustices I have been made aware of.
We all hear gossip on a regular basis, and for the most part, it’s harmless and we ignore it. But what happens when gossip escalates in derogatory speech about another person? Or even worse, escalates into the spreading of malicious lies about another person that has the effect of destroying the good name of that person.
These damaging words spoken in the shadows can have a terrible affect on the victim. I’m sure many people have read recent newspaper stories about situations where negative gossip about a person ( true or not) resulted in suicide by the victim of that gossip.
Having heard some very malicious and hurtful words spoken over the last few weeks about friends of mine, I was reminded of how damaging that type of speech was to me, and how damaging to the victim.
I cannot tell anyone how to live, but I can abide by my own commitment to try to minimize the pain caused by gossip, rumors and outright lies.
These are my commitments:
• Even if the information is truthful, it is simply wrong to spread negative information about another person unless who I am speaking to has a need to know the information. If others would be hurt by the same information being said about them, they should not repeat it.
• 1 will distance myself from anyone who spreads gossip or malicious rumors.
If the negative speech is severe I will end the conversation.
• 1 will notify the target of the negative speech and discuss it with him/her, rather than spreading it and further destroying his/her name. Often rumors and outright lies can be easily refuted by the victim. Gossip maintains its strength only by being whispered in the shadows.
• Question the integrity, motives and intentions of those spreading negative or hateful words. They likely have a hidden agenda.
• Do not assume that silence by the victim means that the allegations are true. It is wrong to make the victim have to prove him or herself innocent.
I apologize for going on a soapbox, but spreading gossip, rumors and malicious lies about another person is simply wrong. It’s the responsibility of each person to do their part to stop it.